Join AT and TOD for Campus Solutions Web-Based Training!

The Office of Training and Organizational Development teamed up with Academic Technology to produce a live web-based training for student services employees to introduce the new Campus Solutions admissions system! If you missed the training, or would like to view it again, you can do so here. The same video is also accessible at training.fscj.edu. Please direct any questions that you may have about the video's content to hrtraining@fscj.edu.

Lending a Hand to the LLC

Last week, the Digital Media Productions team took a literary trip to the Deerwood and Downtown Campus LLCs.  In honor of African-American History Month, we helped the LLCs shoot a series of interviews and readings with FSCJ administrators, faculty, and staff about their favorite African American authors.  You can find the finished videos on the FSCJ Library and Learning Commons Facebook page.  Check them out!

Join Us for January's In Focus LIVE!

 

Not sure where to turn or who to call when you're looking around for technology assistance?  What's the best way to find out the answers for yourself? What enterprise resources are available here at the College? We answered these questions (and more) in January's broadcast.

 

On Friday, January 27th at 10:00 AM, the Academic Technology Team live streamed the latest episode of our In Focus series, which took a deeper look at Information Technology Services' new website, help.fscj.edu

Our broadcast started with a general overview of how to use the site and provided a closer look at some of its improved features. The Educational Technology team explained how to fill out a help ticket, how to request new technology, and how to easily reset your password without having to contact the help desk. WE clarified when to use the "Request a Service" feature and when to use "Get Help", and shared some available resources for new faculty and staff. 

You can view a recording of January's In Focus below. Please feel free to send any questions that you may have after viewing it to et@fscj.edu, and stay tuned to this blog, the FSCJIT Twitter, and help.fscj.edu for information about future In Focus LIVE broadcasts!

Taking Notes with your Mobile Device

When I got my first iPad five years ago, I had grand dreams of how it would allow me to streamline my life by allowing me to have all of my work, play, and family resources in my tote bag whenever and wherever. My original iPad (and the iPad mini that replaced it), went a long way towards meeting this goal, but over the years I found that there was perpetually one specific functionality that was never quite perfect: notetaking.

I could, of course, take detailed notes and draw complex pictures on my iPad relatively easily. There have been a number of great styluses on the market over the years, some of which have the ability to write on the screen like a pen (we recommend the Adonit Jot Pro for writing) and draw like a pencil (we use 53's Pencil for drawing with touch sensitivity). The problem was always the app--I was never able to find one that allowed me to use the notes in another format.

The ideal note taking app should integrate with the other tools that you use for productivity, and allow you to share your notes with others who may not have access to the same apps or equipment that you have. In order to do that, the app needs to be able to translate your handwriting into text. Enter: NEBO! 

As shown in the video above, MyScript's Nebo app uses a technology that they have dubbed "interactive ink" that allows you to easily manipulate notes and text by using intuitive gestures on your tablet. You can mark up text to create headings, bulleted lists, diagrams, and mathematical notation. Double tapping on the content turns it into standard text and illustrations that can be exported as a .pdf, word document, or html! 

Nebo is the note taking app that I have always wanted, but it does have one drawback: at this time, it is only available for iOS and Windows devices. MyScript currently offers a beta version of its Stylus app, which offers more a more limited interface that also utilizes the interactive ink technology. 

For those lucky notetakers who have an Apple or Microsoft mobile device, click here to learn more and download the app for free! 

Professional Development Day: SharePoint Webinar

Did you miss Training and Organizational Development's SharePoint Webinar on Professional Development Day? You're in luck! Click the image below to view the recording, which was delivered by TOD's Training and Development Specialist, Dr. Barbara Moyer. 

For those who may be unfamiliar with the topic, SharePoint is a useful file-sharing tool that is a free part of the Office365 Suite to which all FSCJ employees have access. It can be used to create departmental or organizational websites, as well as for project collaboration and document authoring. In the webinar, Dr. Moyer begins with the basics of setting up a SharePoint site, and continues with a discussion of the major features of the application.

If you are a more advanced SharePoint user, the Training and Organizational Development Office hosts face-to-face classes to help you move to the next level. Find more information about this and other TOD offerings at https://training.fscj.edu/.

Try Adobe Spark to easily make Memes, Videos, and Websites!

Recently, we on the EdTech team have become moderately obsessed with Adobe Spark (OK, maybe it is just me, but my obsession is large enough to cover everyone). Spark is comprised of a free web-based tool that makes beautiful memes, webpages, and videos for the casual user. Unlike some of the other Adobe creativity tools, you don't have to have a graphic designer or video producer on staff to make something that is both informative and aesthetically pleasing. I used it to make the meme below that adds visual interest to an otherwise boring Twitter post: 

Adobe Spark contains a library of Creative Commons images that can be searched via a keyword (to find this image, I searched "old technology"), then added by just clicking on them. You can also upload your own images from Dropbox, Google, or your computer. It has ten different filters to add a specific look or style to your images. It also provides a variety of options for text color, font, and placement, and provides suggestions for a color scheme, based on the colors in your image. Who knew that design could be so easy? 

These same design tools can be used when creating webpages and videos, both of which have a higher degree of applicability to the educational user. Rather than having students create a powerpoint or prezi, encourage them to turn their content into an artifact with polish, that they will enjoy making and be proud to share. Check out the video below, provided by Adobe, for more information, then visit http://adobe.ly/1OsodWC to get started!

Students and Technology: A Recent Study

Educause recently released their 2016 Students and Technology Research Study, which details how higher education students in the United States use technology as a tool for learning, which types of technology they favor, and what teaching strategies enable them to engage with content. The study's purpose is to assist institutions and educators in identifying broader trends in student behavior that can be used to make improvements to college IT services, as well as to adjust teaching strategies to increase technology productivity. The comprehensive 48 page study is worth a read for those who would like a deeper understanding, but for those who would like a snapshot of the larger trends observed in the study, Educause has also produced an eye-catching infographic. Both can be viewed here, along with more information about the study's methodology.  

Future Digital Media students

Today the Digital Media Productions studio was full of excitement as magnet TV Production students from the Frank H. Peterson Academies of Technology came to visit and talk about their futures, FSCJ's program offerings, and possible careers.  The students asked great questions and even got a chance to get in front of the cameras for a change.  We're looking forward to seeing many of them back in our studios as FSCJ students in the near future!

Digitizing history

This week, photographer Curtis Lyles had the opportunity to photograph a 115 year old magazine/book for English professor Laura Jeffries. Dr. Jeffries wants to use some of the pages for a conference presentation, but the age of the book made photographing it a delicate process. We tasked Curtis with helping digitize the pages and he went about figuring out a set up that would work to eliminate shadows from the frame of the page without blowing out the background white of the page, or damaging the book. He placed two soft boxed lights on each side of a work table in our studio to push out any shadows caused by the book. Using our camera jib, he was able to bring the Nikon D800 between and above the soft boxes to get a clear view of the book without casting any shadows into the frame. After adjusting the camera, we were on our way to digitizing and sharing an interesting piece of literature from our history.  

Useful Apps During the Hurricane

Although I coincidentally managed to be out of town during Hurricane Matthew, I asked my friends and colleagues which apps they found to be most useful and reviewed them this week on The Chat. Watch the segment and find my list below so you're even more prepared in the future.

The Weather Channel
This app, along with your preferred local news app for live streaming and up-to-date radar information.

Twitter

JSO kept readers aware of up-to-date info on this social media app.

Facebook Safety Check

This is a great way to let others know you're safe.

FEMA

Explains how to prepare ahead of the storm and allows users to submit photos of damage afterward.

iHeartRadio

You can listen to the local radio here, which provided great coverage during the storm.

Hotel Tonight

If you needed to evacuate during the storm, this app was helpful in finding availability of last minute rooms in a specific area. 

Grubhub

Discover which nearby restaurants will deliver and if they were open after Matthew made it's way through the area.

FSCJ Safe App

This app has so many useful features, including Emergency Contacts, Friend Walk, Virtual Walkhome, Campus Maps and Alerts. 

Firechat

The app provides public and private communications that work without Internet access or cellular data,  which is perfect during natural disasters, massive events, historical elections, or even large festivals.

Most Recommended by those asked:

JaxReady
From Emergency Preparedness Division and Information Technologies Division of the City of Jax, this app assists users in monitoring weather threats and plan for evacuation in their specific location. It also provides access to current threat levels, weather reports, and wildfire updates.