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Going Cold Turkey – Studying with Moderation

Student Content, EdTechThomas Lewis
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It’s the day before the test and you’re getting down to the wire in terms of studying. However, you can’t seem to stop making new tabs with YouTube, Netflix or Reddit while staring down Blackboard. These distractions can be troublesome as your limited amount of time is now being eaten away from your studying efficiency. Sometimes you can tell yourselves that a five-minute break isn’t a big deal, but those times can stack up against you once you put all of those breaks together.

Instead of taking a bunch of breaks everywhere, why not do bigger chunks of studying without having the temptation to open another tab to distract you? For most people, it’s hard to have that self-control because our minds can run rampant and then you’ll want to go look some piece of information up.  Many people who want to become more driven just delete their social media accounts, which is an effective method but it’s also very destructive.  There’s a better solution though, an application that doesn’t just block you from popular websites but also helps you with the important skill of moderation.

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Introducing the Cold Turkey Blocker! A free application that not only helps you moderate your distractions but completely locks you out of any distracting website for the time declared. If you want to pay an additional fee you can block applications and create a schedule as well. Once the timer for Cold Turkey has started, there’s no undo button, you have to wait out the entire duration! Cold Turkey comes with these default web sites blocked, but you can add as many as you need.

4chan.org

9gag.com

addictinggames.com

amazon.com

boingboing.net

bored.com

break.com

bufferapp.com

buy.com

ebay.com

espn.go.com

facebook.com

feedly.com

flickr.com

fmylife.com

funnyjunk.com

funnyordie.com

instagram.com

penny-arcade.com

pinterest.com

pof.com

reddit.com

runescape.com

stumbleupon.com

theoatmeal.com

twitch.tv

twitter.com

In case that’s not enough and you need to write a paper, there’s an even better way to block out the distractions. Using the Cold Turkey Writer, which is essentially a notepad that locks you out of everything until the time limit you have set is over. Another option available is that you can’t close the Writer until the word count you set is complete. Although this seems like a lot in terms of preventing distractions, this forced moderation really helps jumpstart the self-control you might need for the upcoming semester!

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Both of these Cold Turkey apps work great on PC/Mac with Google Chrome, Firefox and Internet Explorer. I can further attest to this as I used both upon writing this article. Check it out!

New Blackboard Apps!

LMS, Tutorial, In Focus, Student Content, EdTechRobyn Reese
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We are happy to announce that Blackboard has released a suite of new, improved mobile apps and that they are now compatible with myFSCJ for Fall 2017 and beyond! Blackboard has split the functionality of the apps to create one that is specifically tailored towards the needs of students and one that is perfect for instructor use! 

Blackboard App (for Students)

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The Blackboard App is the current name for the student-centered version of Blackboard mobile. It replaces the current Blackboard student app, which has been discontinued.

It is available in the iOS App Store, in Google Play, and in the Windows Store. 

Like the previous version of the Blackboard mobile app, students can still take tests, view announcements, post discussions, and review grades with Blackboard App. Now, the app is optimized for mobile, so that the content will adapt to all screen sizes and be more visible and accessible! Users can also upload assignments and attachments from Dropbox, Google Drive, and OneDrive, making it easier than ever to work on the go using just your mobile device. The new homepage for the app also features an activity stream, displaying due dates, posted grades, and assignment uploads for all classes in one continuous, integrated flow. Collaborate is also now fully integrated into the mobile experience, so students do not need to use another app or their browser to join learning sessions on their phone or tablet. 

The Blackboard app will be continuously updated, with the intent of making it easier and more efficient for students to complete online coursework wherever they are. For more information, visit Blackboard's help site.

Login to the Blackboard Student app:


Blackboard Instructor

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The Blackboard Instructor app is brand new, and only shows the courses that are being taught, not those that the user is enrolled in. Instructors can use the app to view and send announcements or make courses available for viewing by students. The app is fully responsive and mimics the content layouts and file structure of a Blackboard course within the full LMS. This structure can also be edited or changed from the mobile app.

The app contains a student viewer that can help faculty to better understand the student mobile experience while taking tests, watching videos, and reading content. The app will also allow the user to export content for use in other mobile apps or in a web browser. It also incorporates Collaborate access natively, so that sessions can be run completely from the mobile app without relying on a browser or separate plug-in. For more information about the Blackboard Instructor App, visit Blackboard's help site. 

Login to the Blackboard Instructor app:


To access your online courses on the Blackboard Mobile app, please follow the directions listed below:

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1. Ensure you have the correct app downloaded onto your smart-device. The Blackboard Mobile app’s icon should appear as a blue square with a pencil. (Note: The Blackboard Learn app, which looks like a chalkboard, is not compatible with myFSCJ, so if you only have that app on your device, please download the correct Blackboard Mobile app).

2. Upon opening the app, you will be prompted to enter your college. Type in “Florida State College at Jacksonville”.

3. You will be presented with a prompt telling you to “Web Login”. Click the “Web Login” button.

4. You will be redirected to the myFSCJ login page. Please login using your myFSCJ userID and password.

5. Locate and click the Blackboard link underneath the “Useful Links” section of the student tab. For instructors, locate the Blackboard link within the faculty tab.

6. This will certify your session and take you back to the Blackboard Mobile app interface.

 

If you are experiencing any issues during any one of these steps or with the functionality of the app, please contact the Technical Service Desk at (904) 646-2300, option 3.

Tools for the Millennial Student Training Materials

Workshop, EdTechRobyn Reese
 

On July 13, 2017, the Educational Technology Department worked with the Office of Training and Organizational Development to offer Tools for the Millennial Student, a look at how technology has changed the educational experience for today's students. The training provided an overview of some apps, websites, and applets that fit into the broad categories of effective learning detailed in the graphic above, drawn from the Adobe Education Creativity Study.

 

MediaSpace/CaptureSpace

For those who are interested in learning more about MediaSpace, FSCJ's media streaming service and CaptureSpace, the screencasting and recording tool, the Office of Training and Professional Development is offering a dedicated session on Wednesday, July 19th at 2:00 at the Advanced Technology Center Downtown. 

You can also view an In Focus webinar that showcased MediaSpace, produced by the Academic Technology Department, here, along with a series of tutorials that explain how to use some of the more advanced features of MediaSpace, like chaptering and video quizzing. Information about the Reach auto-captioning service for MediaSpace can be found by watching this tutorial. Remember that, as discussed in training, all academic videos should be captioned to 99% accuracy in order to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act. 

Blackboard Collaborate

Based upon the results of the exit survey that we administered at the end of the training, many of the participants wanted more information about the use of Blackboard Collaborate. You can find a series of webinars that detail the many features of Collaborate, along with best practices for their use, here. 

Thanks so much for attending our training! For more information about inititiatives offered through the Training and Organizational Development Office, click here to visit their website. 

Apps for Student Success Presentation from HHS Common Orientation

EdTechRobyn Reese

Thanks so much for attending our presentation, Apps for Student Success, at the Health and Human Services Common Orientation, held at North Campus on July 14th. Below is a copy of the presentation used, which includes the names of all of the recommended apps and information about how to get them. Due to high student interest, we also wanted to share some information about how to get free copies of the Microsoft 365 suite of productivity tools for your home computer. Instructions for doing so can be found here. 

Best of luck to all of you as you continue your degree program at FSCJ! It was a pleasure to meet you, and please do not hesitate to reach out to Information Technology if you ever have questions or issues with computers, Blackboard, or any other FSCJ system.

Taking Better Selfies!

Photos, Student ContentRobyn Reese

In the age of Facebook, Instagram, and Snapchat, taking flattering selfies seems like an important life (or even career) skill. Each day, when scrolling through my social feeds, I see well-composed photos of people at the springs, in front of famous monuments, or snuggling with their super adorable pets. I have to admit that this annoys me slightly because I am HORRIBLE at taking selfies. In fact, I sometimes feel like I am the only Millenial who cannot manage to hold my phone out at the right angle and compose my face so I look gently happy and in possession of the right number of chins. Granted, I am kind of an old Millenial, but I refuse to believe that I am as old as I look in my selfies.  

When discussing this with my coworkers, who are depicted in the lovely images below, I was told that awesome selfie-taking is not some sort of crazy voodoo magic, but rather is a skill that can be learned through practice and the application of a few simple principles, as explained below. 

  1. Know your Angles It turns out that "your good side" isn't really a myth! Take some time to look at yourself in the mirror (or on your camera's screen) to determine how to hold your face in a way that you think is most flattering. Generally, people who take good selfies are making the same face, at the same angle, in all of their photos. They are not necessarily naturally photogenic, they have just figured out how to work what they have. You have "it", too, you just need to find "it".  
  2. Camera Placement This is somewhat of a controversial issue. Many people believe that holding the camera out and slightly up can keep you from exhibiting the dreaded five chins. It can also produce odd shadows on your face, though, and it can look a bit forced. Alternatively, holding the camera on the same level as your face, and within two feet of it, can produce a nice look. To keep your face sharp while snapping an image, poke your chin out and down while shoving your shoulders down into your back and away from your ears (remember, beauty is pain).
  3. Lighting is Everything  Proper lighting can change the look of the planes of your face, the texture of your hair, and the quality of your skin. Natural lighting is best for photography, and especially flattering is the "Golden Hour" around sunrise and sunset. If taking a photo in the middle of the day, try to keep the harsh sun behind you, but use your head as a natural block of the actual sun to avoid overexposure. Avoid fluorescent or harsh lighting at all costs--if taking photos inside, try to find a window or skylight with slightly filtered natural lighting.
  4. Background Choice Your background should reflect the purpose of the shot and should be thoughtfully chosen. If you want to document your visit to a fabulous location, focus on making that the focal point of the photo by holding the camera further away from you and experimenting with different viewpoints until you find something that looks interesting. If you just want to show off your outfit or a new haircut, keep background distractions to a minimum.
  5. Take a Million Shots Great photos don't happen by accident. Usually, that perfect image seen on your friend's Instagram is just one of twenty slightly different takes on the same subject. The burst feature on your phone's camera can really come in handy here, as it will allow your phone to take a series of photos while you focus on voguing.  Try moving the camera up and down, or rotating the phone and your body on an axis.  Be experimental! This is supposed to be fun (at least, that's what I hear).
  6. When All Else Fails, Filter!  Postproduction is always important! Instagram and Snapchat come with tons of built in filters to change the coloring of an image, or to blur it to mask tiny imperfections. I am also a big fan of the Adobe Photoshop Fix mobile app, which allows you to adjust color, fix blemishes, cut out backgrounds, and even use a clone stamp tool to remove tiny distractions. 

Good luck, happy selfie-ing, and don't forget to smize! 

 

Get into your students' heads with Socrative!

EdTechRobyn Reese

The image above, taken from a series of French postcards published in 1899, posits a vision of an ideal twenty-first-century classroom, in which knowledge is literally transmitted into students' heads via cables and a headset. It such a system, I assume, each student would receive the same packets of knowledge in exactly the same format, and thus each student would leave the educational experience with a targeted and identical set of skills. 

This postcard helps to exemplify the fundamental problem of education, one that has clearly existed forever: how do we ensure that students receive the message that we as educators intend to send, and thereby achieve universal mastery for all students? Without an elaborate brain cabling system like the one depicted above, it can be practically impossible.

Assessment is the closest remedy that current instructors have to the problem of uneven understanding, but it is also among the most time consuming and hated features of the instructional cycle for both students and teachers. Thus, when we discovered the app Socrative earlier this year (courtesy of Kent Campus-based History Professor Dana Logan), we were amazed at the ease with which it enabled the creation, administration, and analyzation of mobile-based assessments.

This free app can be downloaded in a student and teacher version for iOS and Android, and can also be used via the web. After signing up for an account, instructors can create short or long-form quizzes that students can access via the mobile app. While the initial purpose of Socrative is for formative assessment at the end of a lesson (it even has a "quick question" feature for on the fly assessment), it allows instructors to utilize a variety of question types, as well as embed related images, figures, and exhibits into questions, making it possible to use the tool for longer form assessments, as well. Once a quiz has been created within the mobile teacher app or the web-based app, it is stored within the interface for later use or re-use.

When the teacher is ready to launch the assessment, they are provided with a number of options that can facilitate classroom and assessment management, such as scrambling questions and distractors or utilizing a teacher-managed pace. Students are able to access the quiz via the Socrative student app by entering the classroom code, a constant letter/number combination that is generated when users sign up for the app. The image to the left provides an example of the launching menu within the teacher's version of the mobile app. 

As the students complete the assessment on their mobile devices via the Socrative student app, the instructor can use either the teacher's mobile app or the web app to view the results in real time, and share them with the students, if appropriate (student names can be hidden). The image below shows an example of a sample World Geography quiz that we administered to test the app, and the results are very instructive. You can see that the color-coded chart provides guidance on concepts that may need quick reteaching, or and it makes it easy to pinpoint individual students may need more intensive remediation. For example, in the example below 80% of the students in the class answered question number one incorrectly, so clearly this content, which dealt with the diameter of the earth, needed to be retaught. Also, the second student in the chart needs additional help, because they missed three questions and are really struggling with many of the concepts. As you can see, Socrative allows you to develop plans to address misconceptions and help your strugglers, before students walk out the classroom door. After class, results can be exported as a .csv or .xls file for manipulation in Excel or uploading into the Blackboard Grade Center.

Thus, while the Ed Tech team has not yet figured out how to build the indoctrination machine that was imagined in the French postcard, Socrative comes pretty close to figuring out what is going on in our students' heads and helps us to do our best to make sure that all students leave us with the skills mastery that is the ultimate and lasting goal of education. 

Watch a Special (End-of-Semester) In Focus: Student Edition

In Focus, DMP, Student Content, EdTechRobyn Reese

At this time of year, we all struggle to make it the last fifteen percent of the semester because we just want to think about the summertime! The drawback of this magical feeling of euphoria is that it is also finals time: the most important part of the term! For April's In Focus: Student Edition, Brandi and Robyn took a look at some apps to help you stay on track during these final days so that you can master your final exams. Then, we switched gears to look at ways that you can make the most of your summer!

After watching the video, you can download the apps that were discussed by clicking on the tiles below. Good luck on your final exams and happy summer! 

iWork, Garageband, and iMovie just got better!

Student ContentRobyn Reese

Good news for owners of iOS devices! When Apple recently updated its flagship apps for productivity and creativity, it lowered their price to...wait for it....FREE! This is great news for users of Apple's mobile devices, as these apps were previously among the higher priced in the app store, ranging from $4.99 to $9.99 each. All are essential for making the most out of your Mac or tablet. Details of the functionalities of each are presented below, for those who are not already familiar with them. Apps are available for Macbooks, iPhones, and iPads, and require that you have one of the most recent operating systems (iOS 10 or MacOS Yosemite).

While these apps are must-haves for the casual user, they also have a number of pedagogical applications as tools for allowing students to synthesize and showcase learning in a variety of cool ways that will help them to develop real world skills. Teachers can also use the last two creativity tools to find ways to deliver instruction to students asynchronously while hitting different learning modalities. 

Pages

Apple's cleanly designed word processing app can help users make visually appealing posters, cards, and flyers, as well as serving as a word processor. Documents are stored automatically in the cloud for easy collaboration. 

Numbers

Numbers is Apple's spreadsheet application, and while it is not highly robust in the formula department (Excel remains the industry standard), it can be used to easily make visualizations of simple data sets. 

Keynote

With a slew of elegant-looking templates, Keynote makes beautiful presentations the norm. Its strengths are in looks and photo editing, though it does not feature as many customizable tools as PowerPoint. 

Garageband

Want to make music or a podcast? Garageband is the app for you! It allows you to easily record voices or instrumentation and comes with built in beats and sound effects. It has been used to create top ten pop songs, and is a great tool for auditory creativity. 

iMovie

iMovie allows you to easily make slideshows and movies with a series of still images or video files. It comes with built in transitions, music, and add-ons like credits and introductions that can enable you to make professional-looking movies very easily. 

Teaching with Technology: Mobile Apps for the Classroom

Workshop, EdTechRobyn Reese

As a part of the Office of Training and Organizational Development's One Step Program, the Educational Technology team presented a workshop on new mobile apps that can be used for creating, sharing, and presenting in the classroom. The video below provides a summary of the information covered in the training. 

Those who are interested in taking this training (or others) through the Office of Training and Development should visit training.fscj.edu.  

In Focus Student Edition: Collaborating on the Go

In Focus, Student ContentElizabeth Rodrigue

A big part of success for college students is keeping up with the work of communicating with professors and fellow learners. This is even MORE important if you are enrolled in online or hybrid courses, since group projects, content questions, and grade inquiries are more challenging when your audience is not right in front of you! Sometimes managing your schedule and workload can feel stressful.

Worry no longer...Educational Technology has your back! Join us for In Focus: Student Edition, where we discuss adding your FSCJ email and calendar to your mobile device and show you some tools for collaborating with classmates efficiently and effectively. 

Technologies covered in this video:

Blackboard Collaborate

Blackboard Collaborate is a web conferencing tool that is used by professors to connect with students. As a student, you can use Blackboard Collaborate to meet with your peers for a group project, attend a webinar, or share and work on documents. There are also tools to share your screen, review a PowerPoint presentation, and write on a digital whiteboard. Blackboard Collaborate can be accessed in courses, if your professor has enabled the Tool. Please ask your professor if it is not visible within the course’s menu on the lefthand side of the course shell.

For more assistance with Blackboard Collaborate, submit a ticket at help.fscj.edu or visit the Blackboard Help site.

Microsoft OneNote

OneNote is a virtual notebook tool that can be used to store photos, documents, links, and audio memos. Notebooks are stored in the cloud, update automatically, and can be shared. There is also a mobile app for OneNote that allows you to take photos, videos, and record audio files. OneNote is Included in Office 365 Suite and is FREE for all FSCJ faculty, staff and students.

For instructions on how to download Office 365: https://fscj.service-now.com/esp?id=kb_article&sys_id=049dc4794f108200e67c76601310c722

For more information on OneNote from Microsoft: https://support.office.com/en-us/onenote

Dropbox (and Paper)

Dropbox is a tool that allows you to store and share digital files with others. The basic version of Dropbox is free and gives you 2GB of space to use. You can write, comment, and embed media in Dropbox and access those Documents from anywhere, even a smart phone!

Click the link below to sign up for the FREE version of Dropbox.

https://www.dropbox.com/register

Google Drive / Docs / Hangouts

Google Drive is a FREE cloud storage service that provides 15GB of space for its users. It accepts all file types and allows for collaboration and sharing with others. Google Drive integrates with the Google Productivity Suite, which includes these free, cloud-based apps: Google Docs, a word processor, Google Sheets, a spreadsheet program, and Google Slides, a presentation program. These are very similar to the Office365 Tool Suite. 

Google also provides a great communication and conferencing tool, Hangouts. It  allows users to text, make FREE calls, or video chat. The video function uses your computer's webcam, but also has screen sharing capabilities, so that you can show someone else what you are working on. You can use it to communicate one-on-one or in a group. It can also be used anywhere, via the Mobile Hangouts app, which is available for iPhones, IOS, and android devices.

For more about the features offered in Google Drive:
https://www.google.com/drive/using-drive/#start

Find out how to get started with Google Docs: https://support.google.com/drive/answer/2424384?hl=en

Find out how to get started with Google Hangouts: https://support.google.com/hangouts/answer/2944865?hl=en

Thanks for watching! If you have any questions or would like to suggest topics for future episodes of In Focus, please email us at et@fscj.edu.

Try Adobe Spark to easily make Memes, Videos, and Websites!

EdTechRobyn Reese

Recently, we on the EdTech team have become moderately obsessed with Adobe Spark (OK, maybe it is just me, but my obsession is large enough to cover everyone). Spark is comprised of a free web-based tool that makes beautiful memes, webpages, and videos for the casual user. Unlike some of the other Adobe creativity tools, you don't have to have a graphic designer or video producer on staff to make something that is both informative and aesthetically pleasing. I used it to make the meme below that adds visual interest to an otherwise boring Twitter post: 

Adobe Spark contains a library of Creative Commons images that can be searched via a keyword (to find this image, I searched "old technology"), then added by just clicking on them. You can also upload your own images from Dropbox, Google, or your computer. It has ten different filters to add a specific look or style to your images. It also provides a variety of options for text color, font, and placement, and provides suggestions for a color scheme, based on the colors in your image. Who knew that design could be so easy? 

These same design tools can be used when creating webpages and videos, both of which have a higher degree of applicability to the educational user. Rather than having students create a powerpoint or prezi, encourage them to turn their content into an artifact with polish, that they will enjoy making and be proud to share. Check out the video below, provided by Adobe, for more information, then visit http://adobe.ly/1OsodWC to get started!

Become a Grammar Superstar!

Student Content, EdTechElizabeth Rodrigue

When it comes to writing, whether it is for work, school, or personal use, grammar and spelling can be a constant issue. Whether you compose with confidence or struggle with the written word, the proofreading app Grammarly can help ensure that your communications are fluid and polished. Grammarly is a free tool that checks for 250 types of spelling, grammar, and punctuation errors, and can also suggest citations for research papers. It is user-friendly regardless of your comfort with technology or writing.

To become a Grammarly user,  you must first make an account on their website, which is linked to the graphic above. Once you have signed up for your free account, you have the choice to either copy and paste English text into their online text editor, or to add the Grammarly extension to the Chrome or Safari web browser. The browser extension will correct any text entered into blogs, social media sites, or online word processors. It will also correct any punctuation or spelling errors in discussions on Blackboard or e-mails as well. The screen shot below displays the portal for creating a new account, while the red arrow in the right-hand corner points to the Grammarly extension within the browser itself. 

If you use Firefox, Internet Explorer, or the Edge browser, you have the option of using the online text editor, which is shown below. Text can be copied and pasted into this screen or typed directly into it. On the left, controls allow you to determine what sorts of grammar and punctuation issues you would like to correct.  

The online text editor is different from the plug-in on Chrome or Safari because the plug-in can correct your spelling and punctuation with just the click of a button. It works on websites like Gmail, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Tumblr. The Grammarly website, on the other hand, provides extra opportunities to connect and learn. These include Grammarly Answers, an online community for writers to come together to ask and answer questions; the Grammarly Handbook, an online guide to help explain English writing, style, and grammar; and the Grammarly Facebook, Twitter, and blog communities.

During the sign up process, you can choose between the free and Premium versions of the service. Grammarly Premium is a supercharged form of the free app that includes an additional plug-in for Microsoft Office, as well as a plagiarism checker. You can choose from three different subscription plans: monthly, quarterly, or annually, and the price adjusts accordingly. The image below details the major differences between the free and premium versions of the service. 

Grammarly can help the simplest writer become polished and fluent. The plug-in will allow you to be sure that your discussion posts, social media posts, and blogs are written as professionally as possible, so that you can make a great impression. Give it a try today! 

EdTech from EDUCAUSE

The ChatBrandi Bleak

This year, I had the opportunity to attend Educause, the leading technology conference in higher education. Along with the incredible amount of information shared through sessions, talks, workshops and keynote speeches, I brought back some very beneficial technologies to share with the College and community. Here's a list of several that I recommended to the Ladies of The Chat, as well as our faculty, staff, and students at FSCJ.

 

Lynda.com

More than 5000 courses in Business, Design, Web, Photography, Marketing and much more that users can watch on a computer, phone, tablet or TV. The site also offers learning paths like Become a Manager, Digital Marketer, Illustrator, Front-End Web Developer, Project Coordinator, User Experience Designer, etc., and states that members with certificates in these paths received 3.5x more career opportunities.

Lynda.com offers a free 10-day trial, then costs $19.99-29.99 per month.

Grammerly

A free browser extension for Chrome, Safari, and Firefox, which corrects over 150 types of complex writing errors. It's currently licensed by more than 600 leading universities and corporations, and there are free and premium versions available.

Google Cardboard & Expeditions

https://vr.google.com/cardboard/
https://www.google.com/edu/expeditions/

Virtual Reality is one of the leading innovative technologies I see lots of buzz about. This low-cost tech gives users a sense of immersion by viewing a location or subject through virtual reality. 

By using Expeditions, faculty can guide their students through a number of virtual field trips including museums, urban hikes, or even the human circulatory system. 

The cost for the basic Cardboard for each student is only $15, or you can upgrade to a customized design for an additional fee.

Candor App

During the conference's opening keynote, the speaker stated that more than 11 million meetings are held in the United States each day on average. She then suggested the Candor app, which opens up the possibility for more creative thinking and divergent thinking. Use the first few minutes of your meeting to prompt attendees to submit their ideas anonymously through the app, so the facilitator can view, evaluate, and decide on each suggestion without only hearing from those who are traditionally more vocal in meetings.

The app is free, as well as the browser instance, and is extremely intuitive.

 

Useful Apps During the Hurricane

The ChatBrandi Bleak

Although I coincidentally managed to be out of town during Hurricane Matthew, I asked my friends and colleagues which apps they found to be most useful and reviewed them this week on The Chat. Watch the segment and find my list below so you're even more prepared in the future.

The Weather Channel
This app, along with your preferred local news app for live streaming and up-to-date radar information.

Twitter

JSO kept readers aware of up-to-date info on this social media app.

Facebook Safety Check

This is a great way to let others know you're safe.

FEMA

Explains how to prepare ahead of the storm and allows users to submit photos of damage afterward.

iHeartRadio

You can listen to the local radio here, which provided great coverage during the storm.

Hotel Tonight

If you needed to evacuate during the storm, this app was helpful in finding availability of last minute rooms in a specific area. 

Grubhub

Discover which nearby restaurants will deliver and if they were open after Matthew made it's way through the area.

FSCJ Safe App

This app has so many useful features, including Emergency Contacts, Friend Walk, Virtual Walkhome, Campus Maps and Alerts. 

Firechat

The app provides public and private communications that work without Internet access or cellular data,  which is perfect during natural disasters, massive events, historical elections, or even large festivals.

Most Recommended by those asked:

JaxReady
From Emergency Preparedness Division and Information Technologies Division of the City of Jax, this app assists users in monitoring weather threats and plan for evacuation in their specific location. It also provides access to current threat levels, weather reports, and wildfire updates.